Why Vikings? lecture Oct 24th

3 Sep

All are invited to this exciting upcoming talk:

Why Vikings? A lecture by Professor Anders Winroth, Yale University


Date:
Thursday October 24, 2013

Location: Lincoln Hall 75

Time: 5:30 – 7:00


Vikings are currently enjoying a “cultural moment” among North American and European audiences, and are being featured in everything from new museum exhibitions to advertizing campaigns to a History Channel series. Why is this?

Anders Winroth is the Forst Family Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies at Yale University.  In 2003, he was named a MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Prof. Winroth specializes in medieval European cultural, intellectual, and legal history, especially the history of canon law. His most recent book is entitled The Conversion of Scandinavia: Vikings, Merchants, and Missionaries in the Remaking of Northern Europe (Yale, 2011).

Here’s an interview with Prof Winroth:

Art History Student Group Welcomes New Members

2 Aug

 

The Art History Student Association is a group of students, along with the help of Professor Sue Taylor, interested in pursuing art history-related activities outside of the classroom. The intention is to expand our knowledge and experience in this field and have fun in the process. Some events that an AHSA member may be privy to include short field trips, film screenings with contextual discussions, tours of private and lesser-known art collections and more. It is also an opportunity to share input and network with your peers. You need not be an Art History major or minor to join!

Pierre-Auguste-Renoir-Conversation-Oil-PaintingPlease contact  the student organizers, Cayenne Garofalo (garofalo@pdx.edu) or Marissa James (assiram41@yahoo.com)  to find out more.

Fall 2013 Sophomore Inquiry Class Themes

2 Aug

Fall 2013 Interpreting the Past SINQs

 We currently have three Sophomore Inquiry classes scheduled for the fall:

Our Fully Online Offering (pending funding)

Instructor: Alaric Trousdale, PhD

Medieval Heroes

What makes a hero?  Are heroes all the same, or are they unique to the culture and time that produces them?  Take Superman, for example; what is it that makes him uniquely American?  The traits and behaviors that a culture idolizes and reveres in its heroes are especially relevant to the historian.  In this course we will study the history and culture of Europe during the Middle Ages (c.400-1500 A.D), focusing specifically on the concept of the ‘hero’  as seen through saints lives, epic poetry and contemporary historical evidence. The course will also provide students with insights into using literature as a source of historical evidence, and how literature is studied by historians. The course encourages students to reflect upon the importance of the ideal, perfect ‘hero’ (and heroine) for understanding the values that cultures hold and to engage directly with selected key primary texts. Students will gain a basic grounding in the history of the European Middle Ages, a survey of medieval heroic literature, and expertise in what it meant to be a ‘hero’ to medieval Europeans.

 

Non Online Fall SINQs:

220px-The_Parthenon_in_Athens

Instructor: George Armantrout, PhD
Ancient Greece
Our main theme will be to examine the ideas of Justice and Law in ancient Greece from the time of Homer down to the time of Plato (ca. 750-380 BCE). To this end we will be reading and discussing a variety of ancient texts. We will also consider the role of the divine and the role of the state in these matters. Since context is important, we will also be looking at other issues such as status and gender. A central concern will be how perceptions of these matters change through time.

 

Instructor: Leslie W. Batchelder, PhD
Seeing is Believing: Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century
In this class we will examine visual culture of the Nineteenth century from photography, to advertising, to the experience of the built environment and urban cityscapes. We will discuss how artifacts of 19th century visual culture in turn helped to form and solidify modern European Identities.

Judaic Studies Courses added to Cluster

30 Jul

We’re pleased to announce that several Judaic Studies courses have just been approved for the Interpreting the Past Cluster:
JST 317U Jewish History from Antiquity to the Medieval Period
JST 319U Rabbinic Culture in the Roman World
JST 324U Historical Introduction of the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament
JST 325U Retelling the Bible

Please feel contact the Judaic Studies Department for more details and the syllabus: http://www.pdx.edu/judaic/faculty-and-staff

YU_Center_for_Israel_Studies_Rome_Menorah_unocad_DSC02802

Lectures on Ancient Egypt

29 Mar

Portland has its very own chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt, and they host a number of interesting lectures throughout the year such as this upcoming one in April on
In The Realm of the Ancient Egyptian God Montu: Temples and Rituals
For details on this and other events, check out their website:

http://www.arce.org/chapters/oregon/events

PSU Classics Society call for members

26 Feb

Here’s info on an organization some Interpreting the Past students might be interested in, they’ve already had some really fun events.

The Portland State Classics Society seeks to develop an appreciation and advocate for a continued use of Classical Languages and Literature in modern education. The Classics Society, or Society for Classical Languages, Literature, and Culture is a student organization at Portland State University founded by students for students which works in close conjunction with Professionals across disciplines to advocate for the continued and imperative use of a broad classics-based liberal arts education at the university level and beyond.

more info at:

https://www.facebook.com/PortlandStateClassicsSociety

Spring 2013 Sophomore Inquiry Topics for Interpreting the Past

21 Feb

Here is the latest roundup:

George Armantrout
Ancient Greece
Our main theme will be to examine the ideas of Justice and Law in ancient Greece from the time of Homer down to the time of Plato (ca. 750-380 BCE). To this end we will be reading and discussing a variety of ancient texts. We will also consider the role of the divine and the role of the state in these matters. Since context is important, we will also be looking at other issues such as status and gender. A central concern will be how perceptions of these matters change through time.

Jesse Locker
The Baroque
Suspended between medieval and modern, the Baroque age (c. 1600-c. 1750) was a time of paradox. While it was characterized by war, upheaval, corruption, and persecution, it was also period of tremendous social, political, scientific, and artistic innovation and renewal, giving rise to such figures as Galileo, Descartes, Rembrandt, and Cervantes, and laying the foundation for modern ideas about science, religion, individuality, feminism, political theory, and artistic self-determination.

This course will be serve as an introduction to some of the major themes and protagonists of this vibrant era, as well as serving as an introduction to interdisciplinary historical method. The focus of the course will be upon the investigation of primary sources—original texts, images, and rare books—and the secondary scholarly literature, as well as developing research, writing, and presentation skills.

Lea Millay
Darkness and Light: Tales from Medieval France and Premodern Japan
Throughout the ages writers have sought to give form and shape to that which troubles our spirits and haunts our dreams. What is this dark thing, this shadow? Carl Jung used the word “shadow” to describe the part of a human psyche that a person does not want to think about or cannot acknowledge—a mythological name for the dark, unlit side of the ego. But Jung’s is a modern view. How were premodern writers influenced by the dark side of human nature? What did they call it and how was it seen? What methods were used to harness it’s force and tap the potential therein? These are some of the questions we will ask as we compare and contrast literary works from Medieval France (lais of Marie de France and ballades of François Villon) with those from premodern Japan (a tale by Murasaki Shikibu and haiku of Matsuo Bashō). Our purpose is not only to explore the theme of darkness and light within unique historical and cultural contexts, but also to discover what connects us as human beings across distance and time.

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